Category

Underwater Hull Inspection

PBCF, propeller,

Energy-Saving Propeller Boss Cap Fins (PBCF) System Returns 5% in Fuel Efficiency

By IMO, Underwater Hull Inspection

Ahead of the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) ambitious and challenging goals for 2030 and 2050, the maritime community explores new ways and accelerates its efforts towards decarbonisation and sustainability. Recently, we performed an underwater Propeller Boss Cap Fins (PBCF) installation job on one of our client’s 50,000 dwt oil tankers. The expected fuel savings generated through the innovative PBCF design are estimated to be in the range of 3-5% with the same reduction in harmful emissions.

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Dive Marine Services conducts first underwater ROV hull inspection in Singapore’s container terminals

By ROV, Underwater Hull Inspection

The Covid-19 situation and its implications to businesses call for radical changes of how we are operating. Safe distancing measures and the minimisation of direct human interaction have accelerated technological development and deployment. For our industry, the use and application of remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) in the space of underwater hull inspections and hull cleaning activities will become the norm.

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DIVE MARINE GROUP SERVICES ANNOUNCES EXPANSION TO GIBRALTAR

By Marine Company, Office, Underwater Hull Inspection

5 MARCH 2020                

SINGAPORE’S DIVE MARINE GROUP SERVICES LAUNCHES INTERNATIONAL GROWTH STRATEGY IN GIBRALTAR

Singapore. Dive Marine Services Pte. Ltd. (DM Group Services) today announced the first step in expanding its marine services business with the acquisition of a new company in Gibraltar.  This marks the beginning of an international growth plan which includes further expansion in Europe and Asia. Read More

3 reasons for underwater hull inspection Singapore DM Group Services

3 reasons to make Underwater Hull Inspection part of your ship maintenance plan

By Feature, Underwater Hull Inspection

Underwater Hull Inspection has been around for centuries. In bygone days, the strongest swimmers on galley ships were sent below hull with primitive tools to remove barnacles and seaweed, or to patch up holes. As ships got bigger and more sophisticated, the necessity for regular hull inspection by the first generation of commercial divers became more imperative as a means to avoid ocean catastrophe from hidden damage.

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